Rear End Collisions and Stopping Distance

rear end collisions

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that rear-end collisions are the most frequent type of collision that occurs on U.S. roads, making up 29 percent of all accidents. By practicing these simple tips, it will greatly reduce the risk of having a rear end accident.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that rear-end collisions are the most frequent type of collision that occurs on U.S. roads, making up 29 percent of all accidents. These crashes often occur because one car follows another too closely, known as tailgating.

Common situations where rear-end collisions occur are when a car has already stopped at the light and when the flow of traffic slows unexpectedly. Distracted drivers who are following too closely fail to notice the stopped or slowed traffic with enough time to react.

Leaving yourself enough space between you and another vehicle is an essential part of safe driving, especially when driving a large vehicle. Since heavier vehicles require more braking power to stop, practicing a safe stopping distance can help you avoid an accident when unexpected factors happen. Unexpected factors include pedestrians crossing without warning in front of your vehicle; or a vehicle ahead of you suddenly coming to a halt.

Remember:

  • Always keep at least 6 second following distance.
  • Aim high and look 15 seconds down the road (identify any potential hazards).
  • In bad weather allow yourself additional following distance.
  • Be aware of wet, icy and snow covered roads as it will take you longer to stop.
  • Avoid any distractions (ie. Radios, cell phone, eating etc.).
  • Be aware of the traffic around you as someone might suddenly pull in front of you.

By practicing these simple tips, it will greatly reduce the risk of having a rear end accident. Remember safety is no accident.

For more safety tips visit our Safety University page: https://interstatewaste.com/safety-university-at-iws/